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Childrens Dental

Winnipeg Childrens Dental Services

Our dentists at Kildonan Crossing Dental Centre are experienced in the treatment of young kids and adolescents.

We know how invasive and uncomfortable a visit to the dentist could be for a young child. Our office is warm, kid friendly and the staff is trained to make your child feel as comfortable as possible.

 

What Should be Done If ….

A Baby Tooth is Accidentally Knocked Out?

Make sure to give our office a call as soon as possible and act quickly. This will help your child feel better sooner and prevent any potential infection.

Before You Arrive: You can rinse the child’s mouth with water and apply a cold pack to reduce swelling.

Of course, don’t worry about dealing with the baby tooth. These are never put back into a child’s mouth (Damages permanent teeth – remember, baby teeth are supposed to fall out!)

Be aware – did you see where the baby tooth went? You’ll want to make sure the child didn’t swallow it.

If your child’s regular activities have an inherent risk of falls, bumps, and collisions, contact our office about obtaining a mouthguard.

Did you know that tooth decay is the #1 chronic, infectious disease among kids? And it’s entirely preventable as well.

Tooth Decay: What You Need to Know

When it comes to tooth decay, problems can start very soon in life. Industry research shows that the sooner your child sees a dentist, the less you’ll have to spend as a parent throughout their life. At KC Dental, we adhere to the Manitoba Dental Association’s Free First Visit directive. That means your child’s first visit is free!

It’s so important to prevent issues before they start, and before they reach the point of becoming painful, expensive, and a negative influence on quality of life.

Your dentist at KCDC will review all this information with you at your child’s first appointment, but here is a summary of how to keep kids cavity free!

Birth to 2 Years Old

Before baby’s teeth erupt, clean their mouth and gums with a soft cloth or baby toothbrush at bath time.  This reduced bacteria in the mouth for when teeth come, and gets your baby used to the new sensation of oral care for when the brushing starts.

If your baby likes a bottle at bedtime, don’t put anything besides water in it.  Any other liquids containing sugar, even milk, will attack teeth all night long.

Never dip a soother in anything sweet.

Take your kid for their first appointment within 6 months of the eruption of the first tooth, or by their 1st birthday; what ever comes first.  This may seem like overkill, but remember it costs nothing for the visit, and serves two really important purposes:

  • We can identify and early problems before they turn into big ones, like cavities.
  • We slowly desensitize your kid to the sights and sounds of the dental office, having them every 6 months for a quick checkup, so that when we actually have to do a cleaning, etc, they are used to us and have had some great experiences!

It is absolutely safe to brush with toothpaste that contains fluoride, as long as it’s just a smear.  This is a proven way to keep cavities from wreaking havoc on your baby’s teeth.

Brush twice a day! Baby may want to brush “by themselves” once they know how, but remember that mom or dad must go back over the job, every time.

2-5 Years Old

Brush with a pea-sized amount of fluoride-containing toothpaste twice a day. Remember that although it’s okay to build confidence by letting kids brush for themselves, mom and dad must go back over the job, every time.

Schedule a check up every six months to catch early signs of decay before they turn into cavities! Don’t wait until problems to happen before coming to the dentist.

Discourage thumb or pacifier sucking – it causes the teeth to not come in properly, resulting in speech and orthodontic problems in the future!  Most kids stop on their own, but if by age 3 this is still happening, talk to your dentist about creative ways to break this habit.

Keep an eye on snacking. While healthy for your growing kid, snacks throughout the day mean that the teeth are constantly being attached by sugar and acid. Ideally there should be no more than three snacks per day, with plenty of water afterward to clear out the sticky stuff.

Cut out the juice, candy, and soft drinks! It’s okay as a treat once in a while, but regular ingestions of this stuff will lead to rampant decay.

Parents must floss their kids’ teeth daily once any two teeth start touching. Don’t miss this golden opportunity to get your kids used to flossing! If you miss it now, they may never start up on their own.

School Age Children

Make sure you supervise brushing and flossing until a kid is seven or eight years old.

Encourage plenty of water after snacking, and avoid snacks more than three times a day.

Make sure your kid wears a mouthguard during physical activities that could involve falls or collisions!

Avoid, juice, soft drinks, and sports drinks.  These will literally bathe your kids’ teeth in sugar and acid, leading to cavities.

Contact Us Today to Book an Appointment.

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kids dental winnipeg

KCDC Stories

12/08/17
Evan McPherson